Update on the coronavirus by Premier Alan Winde - 23 May 2020

As of 1pm on 23 May, the Western Cape has 6146 active cases of Covid-19, with a total of 12947 confirmed cases and 6525 recoveries.

Total confirmed Covid-19 cases

12947

Total recoveries

6525

Total deaths

276

Total active cases (currently infected patients)

6146

Total number of tests

114869

Hospitalisations  557 of which 154 are in ICU or high care
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Municipality

Cases

Recoveries

City of Cape Town

 11338

 5992

Cape Winelands District Municipality

 635

 344

Central Karoo District Municipality

 1

 0

Garden Route District Municipality

140

71

Overberg District Municipality

 65

 33

West Coast District Municipality

 95

29

Unallocated

673

56

Total

12947

6525

 Sub Districts Cape Town Metro:

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Sub-districts

Cases

Recoveries

Western

1380

 774

Southern

 1436

 544

Klipfontein

 1533

 726

Mitchells Plain

 1271

 673

Tygerberg

 2030

 1172

Khayelitsha

1741

1007

Eastern

1153

677

Northern

794

419

 Sub Districts Non-Metro:

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Municipality

Cases

Recoveries

City of Cape Town

11338

5992

Cape Winelands District Municipality

635

344

Breede Valley

79

37

Drakenstein

238

84

Langeberg

10

3

Stellenbosch

90

40

Witzenberg

218

180

Central Karoo District Municipality

1

0

Beaufort West

1

0

Laingsburg

0

0

Prince Albert

0

0

Garden Route District Municipality

140

71

Bitou

13

6

George

44

18

Hessequa

8

7

Kannaland

1

1

Knysna

36

17

Mossel Bay

30

19

Oudtshoorn

8

3

Overberg District Municipality

65

33

Cape Agulhas

4

2

Overstrand

27

18

Swellendam

8

5

Theewaterskloof

26

8

West Coast District Municipality

95

29

Bergriver

19

6

Cederberg

2

0

Matzikama

2

0

Saldanha Bay

30

5

Swartland

42

18

Unallocated

673

56

Additional data can be accessed on the dashboard at https://coronavirus.westerncape.gov.za/ 

The Western Cape has recorded an additional 19 Covid-19 deaths-bringing the total number of deaths from the virus in the province to 276. We extend our condolences to the family and friends of the deceased at this time.

Hospitalisation:

The Western Cape is starting to see increased patients receiving care in our hospitals as we move towards the peak of the infection in the province. At the close of business yesterday, 557 patients were being treated in hospital, with 154 of these in ICU or high care. The Western Cape hospital system has the capacity to deal with the demand for hospital beds at this time.

In our preparedness planning, the province has taken into account all of the available beds in both the public and the private sector.

Our existing public sector capacity can provide 2162 acute beds, which includes 658 additional beds created through expansion.

We are also bringing online 1428 additional intermediate care beds in our temporary or "field hospitals" in the Western Cape. Construction on the hospital facility at the CTICC, which will provide 850 of these beds, is well underway and on track for completion in the first week of June. Another 330 beds will be made available at a temporary hospital at Brakengate, 150 at the Cape Winelands Sonstraal Hospital, 68 at the Khayelitsha Thusong Centre, and 30 additional beds at Tygerberg hospital.

In the critical care space (ICU and high care), we will reach a total of 850 ICU beds in the province, the majority of which already exist. We currently have 150 existing beds at public healthcare facilities. An additional 100 beds are being added. We have also arranged to purchase 300 ICU beds from the private sector for public sector patients. The private sector also has an additional 300 ICU beds available in addition to these.

The vast majority of people who contract Covid-19, will not require hospitalisation which is evidenced by the fact that more than half of our total caseload have now recovered. However, in order to ensure that we are able to offer the appropriate level of care to those who need it, we need every resident to play their part to reduce infections, and more specifically to protect the vulnerable who are at a higher risk of becoming seriously ill. As we have indicated before, even in the best case scenario, and with both private and public beds, we will fall short of ICU beds. 

This requires us to take stock of our behaviour and look at ways in which we can make changes to help flatten the curve and reduce the risk of transmission. This includes staying home as much as possible, especially if you are over 60 or have an underlying illness. When leaving home, hygiene measures such as washing or sanitizing your hands, not touching your face and keeping your distance from other people are highly important. Wearing a clean, cloth mask should not replace these behaviours, but they should all be used together, for maximum effectiveness.

Eid:

Tomorrow, our Muslim residents will mark the holy day of Eid. This is a time that is traditionally marked by attending Mosque and visiting with family and loved ones. This year's Eid celebrations will be markedly different as a result of lockdown in South Africa but I hope that despite not being able to share the day with all of your loved ones in person, that the day does not lose its spirit of kindness, sharing and connectedness. May all of our Muslim residents have a blessed Eid celebration.